Wayfaring MD

I am a family medicine resident who likes to highlight the hilarious in medicine as I write about patients, medical school, residency, medical missions, and whatever else strikes my fancy.



Disclaimer:
HIPAA is for reals, folks. All of my "patient stories" have been changed to protect patient privacy. I will change any or all identifiers, including age, location, race/ethnicity, sex, medical history, and quotes.
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Posts tagged "ermedicine"

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I want you and ERmed to be on shift together one day, just for the battle of the clouds. Studying cloud dynamics seems like a fun research project…

lol. The intern I’ve been working with might as well be ERmedicine because his black cloud is legendary. But for the past 2 call days, mine has won over.
But cloud dynamics would be an interesting research project.

doctorjax replied to your post: First day as a backup complete.

Question! What is a white cloud and a black cloud? Is that code for something…?

White clouds are people who tend to always have easy call days. Things usually go smoothly when they are on call, and the halls are even Q-word when they’re on. The admissions they get are usually simple and straight-forward, and no one crumps when they’re on call. There are no surprises in their procedures and their patient census stays pleasantly busy but not overwhelming. 

Black clouds, on the other hand, are people like our friend ERmedicine whose workdays are always filled with disaster. These folks tend to have multiple codes, patients who decide to take a turn for the worst, or patients with really weird/crazy things going on. They get multiple bouncebacks, the frequent fliers everyone hates, and people who are just plain sick as stink

More on Black clouds here.

So I definitely had an interesting dream involving you doing a dance around a hospital in Africa while it was raining with this song playing in the background. It seemed like it belonged in an episode of Scrubs.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdBcfRhzzAA (see above)

Pretty sure that was the weirdest dream I ever had and you should definitely post this because it’s worthy of a few laughs.

you have no idea how much I needed this laugh yesterday. When I read it, at first I thought,
But when I picture this in my best JD-daydreamy manner,
I see myself doing a little of this 
with a little of this 
and probably some of this too
.
What kind of dancing did you see me doing, ermedicine? And what did I look like doing it? Because let’s be honest here, when you say “dreamed,” you mean”fantasized”.

princeton-medbloro:

From here on in, residents are now authorized to practice rapid sequence intubation on medical students only while in the simulation lab and only with attending supervision.  We value the safety of our medical students.  Somewhat.

Sincerely,

Dr. Bartholomew Jay Baffled

Dean of Absurd Policies & Practices

Princeton-Medbloro Teaching Hospital

Dang it. I knew this would come back to haunt me. Sorry Dr. B. Next time I’ll give you a call when I want to knock ERmedicine out.

Asker su-cculent Asks:
OMG! I love your tumblr♥ Anyway, I'd like to ask you two things: do you know what is like to be an emergency medicine doctor? And what college do you think is the best to do before the med school? Thankss
wayfaringmd wayfaringmd Said:

Well, no, I haven’t done much ER work. But I can tell you a few things about ER medicine that are just sort of common knowledge in the medical world. For specifics I’d ask blue-lights-and-tea, who is an A&E (the fancy British way of saying ER) doc in the UK, Cranquis, who is an Urgent Care doc (Urgent Care has a lot of similarities to ER work), or ERmedicine (who works in an ER but keeps his job title a secret other than to say he is not a doctor). 

So here’s a few things to know about the ER:
1. It’s great for people who don’t mind not having continuity of care. You see the patient once, get ‘em stable, and either send them home or turn them over to another doc to admit them.

2. It can be very frustrating to deal with “frequent fliers” and people who come to the ER for non urgent problems (which make up about 50% of ER patient visits).

3. It’s not like TV. Not every patient who comes in is crashing and needing to be intubated or shocked. Sure, that stuff happens, but not like TV would have you to believe. 

4. You have to be ok with seeing patients across the demographic spectrum. You’ll likely see kids, teenagers, adults, pregnant patients, and old folks. If you don’t like handling one of those groups of people, maybe ER isn’t for you. 

5. You can sub-specialize. There are options to do fellowships in Trauma, Pediatric ER, Critical Care, Sports Medicine, or Toxicology.

_________________________________________________________

As for where to go to college, it ultimately doesn’t matter much. Find a school with a decent reputation that you enjoy and that you think you can do well at, and go there. Find a place that has a good program for the major you intend to pick. Names don’t matter all that much. You can try to find undergrads that are affiliated with med schools if you want a tiny bit better chance of getting in, but it’s not a must. For more on that topic, check these two posts

rawrmonstah replied to your post: I haven’t been following you very long, but I had no idea you’re a girl. And then you started talking about clothes. -_-

You can use the GenderAnalyzer to analyze if a blog is written by a man or a woman. The good news is they are 85% sure you are a woman. genderanalyzer.com

This is awesome. Here’s some results from the gender analyzer:

You win the Girl-bro award, friend. 

Looks like it doesn’t quite have all the kinks worked out yet. 

Hopefully everyone is done with finals now and can pay attention to the more important things in life, like hilarious posts from fellow students. You know, there are SO many things that can get in the way of studying. Sometimes important things come up and studying has to be put on hold.

You know, things like:

- Your Hunger Games book/blog/illegally downloaded video. 

- Increasing proximity to spring break or graduation. 

Active Labor.

- Or Facebook

And at other times your upcoming test gets so inside your head that everything else that happens in your life is somehow related to your test performance. 

For example: 

- the timing of your favorite tv show’s ending

- the next song on your playlist. 

- your dreams 

But whether you are prepared or you procrastinated, your hope is the same. 

P=MD